PERUSING THE MARKETS OF PARIS

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Many people travel in a way that allows them to “put checks in the block.” By this, I mean that if they have a week in one location, each day is packed with museums to see, places to eat, and little time to meander and simply absorb the culture. Fortunately, it seems that the cultural focus of travel is becoming increasingly prevalent – particularly with millennial travelers.

While in Paris with a girlfriend, we were determined to spend our time outside of the typical itinerary of Eiffel tower, Arc de Triomphe, and Louvre (don’t get me wrong, we did those too!) by wandering around the local markets. Navigating to and from these markets took us out of our comfort zone, and allowed us to enjoy the true culture of each neighborhood.

We started by taking the Metro to the Marche les Puces (which includes 15 markets!). Unless you are prepared and directionally aware, I would suggest considering taking an Uber or cab to this area since the metro exit isn’t necessarily in the best area of town.

I can assure you that if you are looking for something, they most likely have it! However, you may have to dedicate a day to finding it. The items at Marche Antica are incredibly diverse including: fabulous fashions from Hermes, Chanel, and Yves St. Laurent, chandeliers, old musical instruments, and restored furniture. It is easy to lose track of where you’ve been and frankly, we didn’t mind that!

When returning to the center of Paris, we decided to continue our shopping by strolling through the food market of Montorgueil. There are few things that smell better at the end of a tiring day than a pop-up stand making crepes! Of course, not all items are prepared to eat on site but a few are. Most items include fresh local produce, fish, crustaceans, and flowers (for color). Your senses will be overwhelmed, confused, and you will most likely leave hungry. Luckily, turn the corner to move onto Rue Petits Carreaux and almost any culinary request can be granted at the dozens of cafes and bistros lining the street.

I encourage visitors of Paris to immerse themselves in the culture by perusing the goods of the many markets. To find the markets that best suit your needs, use these resources:

http://www.timeout.com/paris/en/shopping/the-best-markets-in-paris
http://www.marcheauxpuces-saintouen.com/1.aspx
http://travel.cnn.com/paris-shopping-guide-061506

WE CAN ALL LEARN A THING OR TWO FROM ICE CUBE…

Photo Credit: Ice Cube Images

Photo Credit: Ice Cube Images

As the artist Ice Cube says, “take a step back and examine your actions because you are in a potentially dangerous or sticky situation that could get bad very easily.” This statement couldn’t be more accurate when deciding whether to opt. for more data while traveling. In our world of smart phones, we are heavily dependent on travel apps, maps, and Googling things. We have become so contingent on our phones, in fact, that we no longer plan where to go for restaurants but instead rely on an app with reviews to locate a restaurant for us.

The good news is that smart phones and tablets have airplane modes readily available for the preservation of data use. The bad news is that we can do almost nothing while in this mode. The confusion comes into play when we don’t know what to turn on or off and then we accidently turn one mode on that uses data unbeknownst to us. Suddenly… BOOM … you are stuck with a sizable bill that you were trying to avoid by relying on the Wi-Fi at your hotel.

Yes, I am speaking from personal experience. I was in Spain and kept my phone on airplane mode the entire trip except for when I was in the hotel. While at the hotel, I was updating a social media post using Wi-Fi when I realized I was almost late for dinner. I ran out of the door, forgetting to switch the settings, and the next thing I saw was a text from AT&T stating that I had exceeding $100 of extra data.

Luckily, AT&T sees this all the time and happily allowed me to retroact my data plan for the month, lowering my extra charges to around $25 (thank you, AT&T). International data plans start around $20 – a small price to pay when you never know what sort of emergency may occur. Go ahead and spring for the extra data for the month of your travel and don’t stress about having to use one of your apps to find that awesome restaurant you read about online. I promise you will be happy that you did.

TAKE THIS TO THE BANK: 5 MONEY TIPS FOR TRAVEL

I spent ten years talking about taking my parents to Europe, six months planning the trip, and two days fighting canceled flights, all to arrive unable to take cash out of the ATM in order to pay our VRBO host. I knew it was sketchy that they required cash but I needed to oblige. I called the banks to let them know I was traveling and did everything that I thought would be enough to ensure monetary security during the trip. However, I failed to take matters into my own hands. As a child, I was taught to ask nicely if I wanted something but as a grown-up, I needed to independently fish for the things I wanted. Nowadays, banks have interactive online portals that allow you to submit your travel information yourself and receive an email confirmation that your travel plans have been logged.

Don’t be like me and believe that the nice lady over the phone is inputting your information correctly (although, I am sure she had the best intentions). Make sure to follow these steps to confirm that you have any and all financial resources that you may need during your trip:

  • Gather the equivalent of at least $100 (more if you want to feel extra secure) in the currency of your final location. Regardless of what taxis, tips, hunger pangs, etc. come up between your departure and arrival at your accommodations, this should have you covered. If you want to bring more and avoid the fees at the airport, feel free to do so. Be realistic though and don’t take out more than you will actually spend as you may end up losing part of the deal when converting the money back to your original currency at the end of your trip.
  • Have multiple forms of payment. You should have at least a debit card and a credit card. The more diverse your forms of payment, the more secure you will be if one card is canceled, lost or compromised.
  • Make sure that your card is internationally accepted. Most credit cards are, however, not all have a chip allowing easy reading by all machines. This was another lesson learned while trying to extract cash from the ATM in Corfu, Greece. My consequence consisted of walking a mile to find a bank that could read my chip-less credit card. I now have Chase Sapphire that not only provides reward travel points but also contains a convenient chip that has been read everywhere I’ve gone since. When in doubt, get the card with the chip and the strip.
  • Travelers’ checks are for the birds. This concept is considered antiquated and less suitable. Stick to traditional currency to guarantee that your money is accepted by the vendors.
  • Submit all travel plans online and make sure to do this for all of the cards, even for those that you may only use in the event of an emergency. It is suggested to do a follow-up phone call to verify that all plans are confirmed within the system. You can never be too cautious when it comes to money and travel. 

The last thing that you want to worry about on your trip is finding an ATM. You could chalk it up to sightseeing with a purpose….by why not avoid the stress, time crunch, and use your resources to enjoy the journey that you have just embarked upon!